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What I Read Online – 08/14/2013 (a.m.)

14 Aug
    • But now, we have the internet made for trivia nerds like me. And so, with a decent news search engine (BBC or The Times), I can find the stories I remember a little about and use them as sermon illustrations. So, no word file for me. Just a decent website and a kooky memory bank.
    • Elshtain refused to change anything she thought or to attempt to change anything you thought simply in order to reach an agreeable reconciliation. Believing instead that falsehood is the opposite of dialogue, and that real disagreement is a hard won victory accessible only through an honest meeting of minds, she gave it to you straight and demonstrated the refreshing value of frankness-with-charity and invective-against-twaddle.
    • I know I speak for my colleagues when I share my desire, with all humility, that my future students see Jean in me. I hope they let me bounce their kids on my knee and tell me about their wives and husbands even as we discuss Augustine or Thomas or Winnie-the-Pooh or Ramsey or just war or John Ford or civil society or Narnia. I hope — I know we all do — that our students know the names of our grandkids. And if this makes us her disciples than that is what we are.
    • If we should argue (as William Lane Craig does) that God is eternal “before” creation and temporal afterwards, then he ceases to be eternal upon creation and becomes temporal. This carries its own difficulties, for it then turns out that the eternal God is not infinite, eternal and unchangeable, but, finite, capable of ceasing to be eternal, and so changeable.
    • I believe that the way back out of this tangle lies in recognizing two facts: the first is, as Augustine put it many years ago, “God can will a change without changing a will”, and the second is the reaffirmation that God and human persons, his creatures, are not and cannot be not equal dialogue partners. A word about each.
    • In such ways as this God accommodates himself to his creation. That is, he comes down in grace and judgment, according to his purpose. This ‘coming down’ is not a case of God re-locating (downsizing!), nor is it a case of acting as-if. It is not make-believe. God really talks to his people; he acts as their gracious friend and disciplinarian. It is simply that God does not change in doing so. But in order for God to achieve his goals he has typically to communicate with his people bit-by-bit.
    • Be in the Word and prayer every day.
    • Encourage your husband in his studies.
    • Take a seminary class (or at least sit in on one).
    • Build friendships with other seminary wives.
    • Trust God is working in your life during this season.
    • Encourage his friendships with other students.
    • Understand your importance.
    • Here’s the reality: you affect your husband’s ministry. He needs you
    • Expect and embrace the struggles.
    • Consider yourself blessed.
    • Your labor is not in vain.
    • In short, sister, your labors matter. Your often unseen and unrecognized service for Christ is never worthless. There are many ways to waste a life, but laboring in gospel ministry with your husband isn’t one of them.
    • Predictably, the best chapter is on the fundamentalist-modernist controversy, and Hart once again makes a compelling case (which he has worked out more elaborately elsewhere) that the tragedy of Princeton was not initially at least about the triumph of liberalism but rather about the encroachment of broad evangelicalism which downplayed differences for the sake of being, to use an anachronistic phrase, gospel centred.   There is a sombre lesson there for the YRR.
    • Certainly in England it was the Strict and Particular Baptists who were largely responsible for keeping Calvinism (soteriologically defined) alive even as English Presbyterianism rapidly degenerated into Unitarianism.
    • “You don’t believe in God anymore? OK”

       

      OK?

       

      It’s not OK. It’s a sin.

       

      But it’s wonderfully forgivable.

    • Heresy is more fatal than heroin
    • Because of all the places in all the Christian documents you could scour, you probably won’t think that a clear summons to worldwide gospel proclamation would be found in the Canons of Dort.
    • Moreover, it is the promise of the gospel that whoever believes in Christ crucified shall not perish but have eternal life. The promise, together, with the command to repent and believe, ought to be announced and declared without differentiation and discrimination to all nations and people, to whom God in his good pleasure sends the gospel.
      • D. A. Carson | Kingdom, Ethics, and Individual Salvation
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      • Michael J. Ovey | From Moral Majority to Evil Disbelievers: Coming Clean about Christian Atheism
      •  

      • Peter Orr | Abounding in the Work of the Lord (1 Cor 15:58): Everything We Do as Christians or Specific Gospel Work?
      •  

      • Owen Strachan | Carl F. H. Henry’s Doctrine of the Atonement: A Synthesis and Brief Analysis
      •  

      • Gerald R. McDermott | Will All Be Saved?
      •  

      • Book Reviews
      •  

           

        1. Old Testament | 3 reviews
        2.  

        3. New Testament | 20 reviews
        4.  

        5. History and Historical Theology | 12 reviews
        6.  

        7. Systematic Theology and Bioethics | 4 reviews
        8.  

        9. Ethics and Pastoralia | 10 reviews
        10.  

        11. Missions and Culture | 8 reviews
    • He has a word document and every time he hears, sees or reads a story that makes him sit up and take notice he writes it out in his word file. He then searches the word file for key words when he is looking for illustrations. This word file is (I hope) backed up!

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Posted by on 14/08/2013 in Current Issues

 

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