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What I Read Online – 01/22/2013 (a.m.)

22 Jan
    • These books stand out as distinctive because they are earliest Christian writings we possess and thus bring us the closest to the historical Jesus and to the earliest church.   If we want to find out what authentic Christianity was really like, then we should rely on the writings that are the nearest to that time period.
    • Thus, a knowledge of Luther’s biography is crucial for understanding his theology.Given the dramatic developments in his thinking, from late medieval monk to elder statesman of a Protestant movement, and the fact that he writes in such a personally engaged manner, his theology must be read against the background of his life story.
    • If possible, work towards making sure your church’s doctrinal standard is one of the historic creeds or confessions
    • Deliberately mine the historic tradition of psalmody and hymnody for worship.  Not that anything written by anyone still alive is to be excluded.  Far from it.  But try to make sure the songs of worship reflect the chronological sweep of the church’s life, from the Book of Psalms onwards.  Make people aware that praise did not begin six months ago.
    • Learn from historic patterns of worship.
    • Pepper your sermons with historical references
    • help people to see how what you are saying is important and connects to what the church has believed through the ages.
    • Have the congregation recite a creed or a part of an historic confession during the service.  Not necessarily every Sunday but with some regularity.
    • Give away free books as part of your regular ministry and make sure you include books on church history
    • We need to start thinking now about how to set things up for the next generation, and that not simply theologically but historically too.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Posted by on 22/01/2013 in Current Issues

 

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