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Did God Really Say? Affirming the Truthfulness and Trustworthiness of Scripture – Quotes, Introduction

24 Aug

I have begun reading:

Did God Really Say?

Did God Really Say?

Publisher: P and R Publishing Company

Author: Garner, David B.

ISBN-10: 1596383992 | ISBN-13: 9781596383999
Cover Type: Paperback

Publisher’s Description: “Did God really say?” is a fundamental theological question. If God has not spoken clearly, truly, trustworthily, and in human words, then anything goes: believe what you will, act as you wish—no one can fault you.

The church’s historical belief in the truthfulness and trustworthiness of Scripture as God’s written Word is being assaulted from without and from within. In this book, seven scholars from Covenant Theological Seminary, Reformed Theological Seminary, and Westminster Theological Seminary confront and repel many of these attacks. Reasoning clearly, cogently, and carefully, they show that the historical doctrine of Scripture is what Scripture teaches about itself, and that this teaching can meet and defeat the ungodly intellectual schemes brought against it.

About the Contributors:

John M. Frame is the J. D. Trimble Professor of Systematic Theology and Philosophy at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, Florida.

David B. Garner is Associate professor of Systematic Theology at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Michael J. Kruger is Professor of New Testament at Reformed Theological Seminary in Charlotte, North Carolina.

K. Scott Oliphint is Professor of Apologetics and Systematic Theology at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Vern S. Poythress is Professor of New Testament Interpretation at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Michael D. Williams is Professor of Systematic Theology at Covenant Theological Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri.

Robert W. Yarbrough is Professor of New Testament at Covenant Theological Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri.

About the Editor: David B. Garner (Ph.D., Westminster Theological Seminary) is Associate Professor of Systematic Theology at Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia.

I will share some of the more challenging quotes from each chapter as I work through the book. Here are some from the “Introduction” by David Garner:

History attests that the health of each generation of the church corresponds to its reverence for God’s Word.

The triumph of evil more often emerges not because overly evil men with explicitly evil motives seek subversively evil ends, but because decent men with professedly constructive motives and commendable ends do not perceive the dangers of their views.

Theological orthodoxy assumed by one generation is the orthodoxy eclipsed by the next. Undiscerning charity fertilizes the seeds of heresy.

“Such men as are for the ‘middle ways’ in point of doctrine, have usually a greater kindness for that extreme they go half-way to, than that which they go half-way from.” (Robert Trail, recorded in James Buchanan, The Doctrine of Justification: An Outline of Its History in the Church and Its Exposition from Scripture (Edinburgh: T&T Clark, 1867), 173.)

Our age erroneously caricatures the exposure of errant theology as intrinsically unkind and even un-Christian.

Overlooking theological error for the sake of superficial peace is both myopic and disobedient.

By the time theological moderates and peace seekers discern the seriousness of a particular theological error, the battle has usually already been lost.

Upholding the truth of the Gospel always involves polemics, but never rightly wages war with unbelief without positively proclaiming the glorious and true hope of the Gospel.

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