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What I Read Online – 05/01/2012 (p.m.)

02 May
    • Mosaic Theophanies: No figure in Scripture had as many encounters with God through theophanies as Moses.
    • Judgment Theophanies: Many scholars consider Genesis 3:8 to be the first theophany in Scripture.
    • Covenant Theophanies: God’s appearances to individuals in the Old Testament were frequently connected to his covenantal dealings with them.
    • Jesus is also the ultimate “judgment theophany.”
    • Jesus is the ultimate “covenant theophany.”
    • God is with us.
    • God is holy, awesome, and majestic.
    • God condescends to us.
    • I love youth ministry, I really do. But the thing is, we have to be sure that we don’t segregate the youth for our sake and theirs. They are part of the body of Christ too, and no part of the body can remain healthy if one of its members is cut off and put to the side. If we segregate the youth, not only do we lose all they have to teach us, but we also inadvertently teach them that the church is really only for adults—those who are married and have families of their own. And then we wonder why they don’t get involved in church as college students or young singles, when in reality, we’ve been telling them all along that the church isn’t yet for them.
    • Two thousand years ago, Jewish children had a clear path to adulthood that included youth ministry. The local synagogue would hire a rabbi whose primary role was educating children. Starting at age 4 or 5 (Beth Sefer) children would learn, read, write, and memorize the Torah. At age 10, having memorized the Torah, children would either spend more time at home learning the family trade or move towards the path of the rabbi. Either path led to an eventual acknowledgment of adulthood at age 30 for men. Culture considered the time in between the period in preparation for adulthood, and the synagogue was invested in that stage of life.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Posted by on 02/05/2012 in Current Issues

 

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