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What I Read Online – 04/06/2012 (p.m.)

07 Apr
    • Schnabel questions the notion that Paul focused on strategic metropolitan cities so that the gospel would naturally flow from there to other cities.
    • The geographical scope of Paul’s missionary work was not controlled by a “grand strategy” that helped him decide in which cities to begin a new missionary initiative. The evidence indicates that Paul moved to geographically adjacent areas that were open for missionary work. This is true for provinces, regions and cities. (287)

       

    • [In] a culture of addiction (and music can be a form of addiction), we must dissociate ourselves from music as the primary social glue in the secular world and spiritual glue in the ecclesiastical world. We must realize that, if we are to be a biblical church, not simply a culturally relevant church, we must discount such heavy dependence on our limited and provincialized inventory of works and get down to the business of depending on the power of the Word and the force of the unleashed gospel. We must look to the Spirit, not to our humanly contrived proxies, as the only Paraclete. (151)
    • church music will always be a marvelous servant and a cruel master.
    • If we avoid speaking of God’s wrath, of God’s justice, of the coming day of divine judgment, of Jesus’ death as an atoning sacrifice for us, we are not changing the form of the missionary presentation of the gospel but its content. The foundational centrality of “Christ crucified” is of critical importance for the existence of the local church. In mission and evangelism the search for a presentation of the gospel that will convince listeners is misguided if the fact of Jesus’ death on the cross and the significance of this death are not central to that message

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Posted by on 07/04/2012 in Current Issues

 

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