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What I Read Online – 03/07/2012 (a.m.)

07 Mar
    • There is a beauty in saying “no” and using those dormant muscles of self-control. And, because it is the Spirit’s power in you, you don’t become a dour ascetic, but discover hints of contentment and satisfaction. These are marks of the Spirit. And with the Spirit’s power, you have undeniable evidence that you belong to your Father.
    • Of course, if one is seeking a meritorious reward, then works are condemned. Not only our sins, but our righteousness, falls short of God’s glory. To offer up our own pretended righteousness to God actually arouses his anger (see chapter 3). In regeneration, we are passive: acted upon and within by the Spirit through the gospel. In justification, we receive Christ’s imputed righteousness (again, chapter 3). In sanctification, we “work out our salvation with fear and trembling,” knowing that God is completing in us that renewing work that he began. It is done with seriousness, but also in the freedom of children rather than the anxious fear of servants who wonder if they will be condemned.
    • The indicative announcement of Christ’s achievement for us in verses 1-11 grounds his imperative. Nevertheless, it is a real imperative. And it’s an imperative not only to rest in Christ, but to work. Because we rest in Christ alone for our justification, we can finally perform good works without wondering anxiously if they are good enough. Of course, they are not good enough to pass God’s righteous verdict as our Judge, but their deficiencies are pardoned for the sake of Christ. It is a great comfort to know that our perfect justification and sanctification in Christ already brings forgiveness of the sins clinging even to our best works! So now there is work to be done, from our salvation, not for it. Work it out. Flesh out its implications. On the basis of the gospel’s indicatives, take seriously the imperatives to love and serve your neighbor. Let’s not collapse justification into sanctification or sanctification into justification. They are distinct yet inseparably related aspects of that salvation that Christ has won for us.
    • So Paul is not simply telling us to look to our justification. That’s not working out our salvation.
    • Thomas Lake is quickly emerging as one of the best writers in America. At 31-years-old, he is currently writing Pulitzer-caliber stories for Sports Illustrated.
    • Was it easy for my single mother to corral a feisty little boy and his sister in the pew? No, it is a testimony to her patience and grace! But it was good for my soul.
    • Let’s be patient, deliberate, and wise, but let’s encourage families to have their children in worship as soon as they are able. Not all families or children will be ready to do this as each family functions under different circumstances. So having said this, let’s not go overboard.
    • So we must be patient and understanding, but it is something we should be aimed at before our children are driving cars! Even if our children cannot understand all that is happening, struggle to sit still, and even are bored at times during the service they are still benefiting from being in the midst of this divine meeting between God and His people (Mark 10:13-16).
    • But as a matter of fact God usually exerts that power in connection with certain prior conditions of the human mind, and it should be ours to create, so far as we can, with the help of God, those favorable conditions for the reception of the gospel.
    • We may preach with all the fervor of a reformer and yet succeed only in winning a straggler here and there, if we permit the whole collective thought of the nation or of the world to be controlled by ideas which, by the resistless force of logic, prevent Christianity from being regarded as anything more than a harmless delusion.
    • What is today a matter of academic speculation begins tomorrow to move armies and pull down empires. In that second stage, it has gone too far to be combated; the time to stop it was when it was still a matter of impassioned debate.
    • So as Christians we should try to mold the thought of the world in such a way as to make the acceptance of Christianity something more than a logical absurdity. . . .
    • I know that it is one of Derek Thomas’s major complaints that people read the Bible too quickly in public worship; the same probably applies to private devotions as well
    • I know that it is one of Derek Thomas’s major complaints that people read the Bible too quickly in public worship; the same probably applies to private devotions as well
    • I know that it is one of Derek Thomas’s major complaints that people read the Bible too quickly in public worship; the same probably applies to private devotions as well
    • I appreciate the underlying idea here: that we always need to be open to having our understanding of a text checked, corrected and improved; but the suggestion here seems either to go further than this or to express this thought rather ineptly.  To set aside analysis and prior knowledge seems to presuppose that what we know already is a hindrance rather than a help to understanding what the passage is actually saying
    • Overall, it seems to me that this articulation of LD amounts to a formalized elaboration in sophisticated language of those Bible studies where everybody has a chance to tell everybody else ‘This is what the passage means to me,’ and, depending on the innate ability of the participants, the group may not necessarily go home with a better understanding of the passage or, indeed, any understanding of the passage at all

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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Posted by on 07/03/2012 in Current Issues

 

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