What I Read Online – 06/08/2013 (a.m.)

    • So gay men have more partners, but no more sex overall, than straight men. Why? In keeping with sexual economics expectations, it’s not that gay men necessarily wish to have more sexual partners than straight men. It’s that they are far more apt to be in relationships that permit them because their relationships are with men, who tend—on average—to be more sexually permissive than women
    • Hey guys, what are your favorite few books on evangelism
    • Well, here’s a thing. A primetime BBC documentary on Tyndale presented by Melvyn Bragg. On TV last night and actually very good. Well worth an hour of your time. Tyndale is, according to Bragg, one of the most significant Englishmen ever to have lived. Agreed. You can watch it on iPlayer for a couple of weeks
    • Just about the worst thing a leader can nurture in his heart is self-pity. And just about the worst thing a leader can do in front of his people is murmur and complain
    • Be vigilant against self-pity when it spots like gangrene in your heart
    • What’s in “the look?” He
    • Not every look turns into adultery, but all adultery begins with the look
    • I am convinced that the look is pride as much as it is lust. The lust of it is born out of pride
    • The look is more than merely resting the eyes on an intriguing sight: it is an evaluation
    • The one who looks with lust has placed himself at the very center of the universe and functionally believes that others exist for his pleasure. In pride he elevates himself to the place of God
    • The way to stop the look is not simply to modify behavior—to train yourself to bounce your eyes, as some authors suggest—but to realign your heart. The look will stop when the evaluation stops. The evaluation will stop only as you dethrone yourself, when you learn to see every person as significant in and of himself or herself, when you see others through the eyes of God
    • As the gospel enthrones the Savior, it dethrones the sinner.
    • The wonder of the Gospel is that God makes much of us even when we do not make much of Him. In fact, maybe I feel most loved when God makes much of me despite me not making much of Him.

       

      He loved me, and gave himself for me.

    • So if you accept this new reading, it says, “Out of the anguish of his soul, he shall see light and be satisfied.” In verse 9 we learned that the anguish of the messianic servant resulted in death. Yet here in verse 11, it is this same servant who sees light. I believe this is a prophecy of Christ’s resurrection.

       

    • Here we see that the gospel is not some kind of eternal principle, like the idea that no matter how dark things get in the middle of winter, spring is always just around the corner. No, the gospel is not a principle that is always true, but rather an event attested to by eyewitnesses at a particular point in time
    • He felt himself, and laboured to convince others, that there is no hope for a sinner but merely in the blood of Jesus; and no possibility of his doing any works acceptable to God, till he himself be first made accepted in the Beloved. Nor did he labor in vain. Now his preaching effected, not only an outward reformation, but a real change of heart, in very many of his hearers. The word was received, as Paul expresses it, not with a rational assent only, but with demonstration and power, in the Holy Ghost, and in much assurance; and their endeavors to observe the Gospel precepts were abundantly more extensive, uniform, and successful, when they were brought to say, with the Apostle, “I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live, yet not I, but Christ liveth in me; and the life I live in the flesh, I live by faith in the Son of God.”

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

About Joe Fleener

Lover of Christ & His Gospel, Husband to Mandy, Father to three wonderful children, Servant to the Local Church, Bible College Lecturer
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