What I Read Online – 04/19/2013 (a.m.)

    • Remember the Power of Imagination–Illustrate!
       – Imagination: the power of the mind by which it conceives of invisible things, and is able to present them as though they were visible to others. (Beecher)
       – Remember that humans have trouble grasping abstract concepts–we need them converted into pictures and examples.
       – Exert your greatest effort for illustrations that reinforce and serve the dominant thought.
       – Think of illustrations as windows that let in light on our subject and help people to more clearly see and appreciate it.
       – Beware of illustrations that draw too much attention (to themselves instead of the subject) or which actually take people away from the main point.
    • You log on to a website, find a mate with suitable characteristics and then arrange to meet to exchange bodily fluids. You continue to meet until conception occurs. After that … it’s up to you. Some co-parents keep in touch and the fathers have some meaningful, if limited, contact with their children. Other dads simply walk away with the blessing of their co-parent, their job done. No money is exchanged. No health checks mandated. No awkward questions asked … you don’t even have to give your surname.
    • Conflict
    • Thick skin and a tender heart are good traits for a pastor. You must teach without fear the whole counsel of God, stand by your convictions, and be winsome, but let the chips fall no matter who may be offended.
    • Discouragement
    • Look for little glimmers of God’s work and grace
    • Suffering
    • Keep yourself apprised of the persecuted Church and regularly pray for it
    • Burnout
    • Have a Sabbath each week. Keep it, safeguard it, and enjoy it. Don’t feel like you have to be at everything and minister to every person. You aren’t omnipresent or omniscient, so don’t act like it. Take vacations with your family
    • Cares of the World
    • Recognize where you are most easily seduced, pray with your wife regularly about it, and let your fellow elders know.
    • Loneliness
    • This requires showing weakness and not pretending to have all the answers all the time. Find someone to pray with regularly
    • Moral Failure
    • Don’t be busy about Kingdom work and forget Kingdom life
    • The late John Murray said, “Nothing shows the moral bankruptcy of a people or of a generation more than disregard for the sanctity of life.”
    • Finally, abortion should be criminalized by the state. Not all sin is necessarily crime (covetousness), nor is all crime necessarily sin (preaching Christ in a Muslim nation), but abortion is both sinful and criminal. The modern state rightly applies the 6th word, “You shall not murder,” in most situations. In order to be consistent, abortion must be a criminal offense which is punishable by the governing authorities, not paid for by the governing authorities.
      • We’ve been chuckling about this in the office because our very own Christopher is a guest blogger over at The Gospel Coalition and has written a very thoughtful and, I thought, gracious blog about presonal presence and preaching. You can read it here. We’ve not been chuckling at the post itself which we all think has something to say. Rather, we like one of the many comments posted as a result:

         

        “dumbest thing I have ever read put out by The Gospel Coalition”

         

         

        Now that is quite an opener! We’ve doctored it a bit and decided we’re quite proud to be home to the dumbest blogger (which is, I admit, not quite what it says). But it did get me thinking about hyperbole:

         

    • In conclusion, we believe a fair summary of our conclusions would be this. It is possible for Christians to disagree about volatile issues. Moreover, it is possible — indeed necessary — to do so charitably. The strong disagreement makes us feel like enemies and strangers, while the charity reminds us of our brotherhood in Christ. The strong disagreement tests the bonds of our fellowship and love for one another, while genuine love covers over a multitude of sins and holds all virtues together
    • This is the most celebrated of the myriad manuscripts of the Latin Vulgate Bible and an important witness to the history of the Christian church
    • Jerome, a scholar from northern Italy who was skilled in both Hebrew and Greek, was assigned to this task. He had at first intended to translate the Old Testament from the Greek Septuagint, but as he worked he came to see that the Septuagint had many weaknesses. For that reason he reached back to the Hebrew text to “give my Latin readers the hidden treasures of Hebrew erudition.” He also realized that the Septuagint included several books, together called the apocrypha, that were absent from the Hebrew Old Testament. Jerome argued that Christians must follow Jews and exclude the apocryphal books from the Bible; it was only in 1546 at the Council of Trent, that the Roman Catholic Church would decree that the apocrypha was also part of the inspired text.
    • The Bible is so widely available today that we may take it for granted and assume that this is how it has always been. Codex Amiatinus reminds us that for over one thousand years, very few people had access to it and fewer still had the ability to read it. And it reassures us that God’s hand was upon his Word all the while, protecting and preserving it, for our good and for his glory.
    • These sermon transcripts represent some 3.5 million words of teaching from over 30 years of Piper’s preaching ministry. The sermons are fully integrated with ESVBible.org and we invite you to explore the complete archive by visiting ESVBible.org, clicking on the cloud icon in the upper left corner, and toggling “John Piper’s sermons.”

       

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

About Joe Fleener

Lover of Christ & His Gospel, Husband to Mandy, Father to three wonderful children, Servant to the Local Church, Bible College Lecturer
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