What I Read Online – 02/15/2013 (a.m.)

    • I was at a “Christians in Business” meeting. There were probably 700 or so in attendance, mostly men. They came from a variety of church backgrounds, but the conference leader and overall content was mainstream evangelical. In many ways, it was a helpful conference, and as a “Christian businessperson,” it was encouraging to be around other like-minded friends. However, one theme kept coming up both from the front and in hallway conversations: “We need this conference because our churches don’t understand us.”
    • Businessman: Your pastor (generally) is better at vines, not trellises. Realize this, and help to build trellises that are limited and supporting.

       

      Pastor: Many of your businessmen don’t naturally take to vine-work, but are naturals at building trellises. Teach them to grow vines, but also take advantage of their trellis power.

    • Encourage businesspeople by caring about their daily lives.
    • Give your businesspeople a vision for, and teach them to do, vine work—in their families, in their workplaces, and in the church.
    • Discussion of recent advocacy of the observation of Lent by some evangelicals continues.  I am not a big liturgical calendar person myself, though I think it prudent and even appropriate to preach on the Incarnation on the Sundays around Christmas and the resurrection on the same around Easter.   I am not one of those who seem to hold that those topics are verboten at such times because the Roman Catholics might be doing the same.
    • Nevertheless, I find the whole quasi-emergent longing for the liturgical calendar in terms of a form of Christian discipling to be a little odd when it occurs among Protestants. Hey, if you want to be a Roman Catholic, then have the courage of your convictions.   And I believe Richard Barcellos has some good things to say over at the website of the Reformed Baptist Fellowship concerning how the issue has recently arisen under the auspices of the Gospel Coalition.
    • 1) Preaching without notes (hereafter ‘PWN’) allows greater liberty in preaching
    • 2) PWN allows greater flexibility in preaching. I often find that up to a third of what I say during a sermon is unpremeditated
    • 3) PWN allows greater passion and pathos in preaching. Unlike lecturing, preaching is not just a means of imparting information. It also calls for communication on an emotional level (pathos) and on a motivational level (passion)
    • It is in this process of meditation that the sermon is forged and, crucially, burned into the memory — where it must of course reside if we are to dispense with notes. I then rehearse the whole sermon in my mind several times in the days leading up to its delivery and this usually gives rise to several slightly different versions of the message, perhaps with different emphases, alternative illustrations and so on
    • This is not helpful to me as an individual or, especially, as a pastor. It creates more work for me.
    • This goes against, for example, what Dr. Carson’s Commentary of the New Testament Use of the Old Testament advocates (and I think rightly). The Gospels narrate these kinds of things for us because they are telling us what happened in fulfillment of the OT and in relation to John the Baptist and the incarnation and ministry (i.e., His sufferings and glory) of Christ. Drawing these kinds of “practical” applications from these types of texts is simply wrong
    • What does that mean and where has God revealed that it is His will for us to enter such? The fact is that Christ already entered the wilderness for us and won! This statement betrays a hermeneutic that is too horizontal, allegorizing, and misses the point of Christ’s wilderness experience. He was driven there to be tempted as our representative and win; unlike Adam in the garden and Israel in the wilderness, Jesus does not give-in to the devil
    • What does that mean and where has God revealed that it is His will for us to enter such? The fact is that Christ already entered the wilderness for us and won! This statement betrays a hermeneutic that is too horizontal, allegorizing, and misses the point of Christ’s wilderness experience. He was driven there to be tempted as our representative and win; unlike Adam in the garden and Israel in the wilderness, Jesus does not give-in to the devil
    • TGC brothers, this post makes more work for local church pastors. It is destructive. It erodes confidence in those involved with TGC. Recently a Mark Driscoll interview was posted on TGC blog where he gave somewhat of a “pass” to Joel Osteen. Check this out by Mark Dever. This is what we need from TGC; a clear sound for truth and against error.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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About Joe Fleener

Lover of Christ & His Gospel, Husband to Mandy, Father to three wonderful children, Servant to the Local Church, Bible College Lecturer
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